All Saints Bay

The Baía de Todos os Santos is formed by 56 tropical islands such as Itaparica, Madre Deus, Maré, Frades, Bom Jesus dos Passos and Matarandiba.

Baía de Todos os Santos is the largest bay on the Brazilian coast (Baía de Todos os Santos has an area of ​​800 km²; Baía da Guanabara, in Rio de Janeiro, is the second largest in Brazil, with an area of ​​380 km²), it was this bay that later named the State of Bahia.

For this reason, several municipalities were founded over the centuries in the surroundings of the Bay, several of which are currently listed as tourist destinations in the State.

The capital of the state, Salvador, is the main city in the Baía de Todos os Santos region.

Several other municipalities are also bathed by the approximately 800 km² of the Bay: Madre de Deus, Candeias, Simões Filho, São Francisco do Conde, Santo Amaro, Cachoeira, Saubara, Itaparica, Vera Cruz, Jaguaripe, Maragogipe and Salinas da Margarida, as well as the islands under the jurisdiction of these municipalities.

Islands in the Bay of All Saints

With 240 square kilometers, Ilha de Itaparica is the largest of all and offers a good infrastructure for tourist services.

Ilha de Maré, with 16 square kilometers, has several inns and restaurants (such as the Oratório de Maré).

And Ilha dos Frades, with eight square kilometers, is the most primitive and offers only beach bars for visitors who come to Ponta de Nossa Senhora.

Another 33 islands, some private, others populated and many uninhabited, are peaceful and very beautiful places, with tropical landscapes formed by beaches and primitive vegetation.

Fort of Sao Marcelo
All Saints Bay

Baía de Todos os Santos is the biggest bay in Brazil

Baía de Todos os Santos is the largest bay in Brazil in territorial extension 1052 km² and also in cultural diversity, handicraft, history, colonial architecture (churches, fortresses, beautiful colonial manor houses and farmhouses) and ecosystems rich in beautiful landscapes, biodiversity such as mangroves, remaining Atlantic Forest, coconut groves, banana groves and reefs [...]

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